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Jehovah’s Witnesses

English
New World Translation of the Holy Scriptures (Study Edition)

According to John 14:1-31

14  “Do not let your hearts be troubled.+ Exercise faith in God;+ exercise faith also in me.  In the house of my Father are many dwelling places. Otherwise, I would have told you, for I am going my way to prepare a place for you.+  Also, if I go my way and prepare a place for you, I will come again and will receive you home to myself, so that where I am you also may be.+  And where I am going, you know the way.”  Thomas+ said to him: “Lord, we do not know where you are going. How can we know the way?”  Jesus said to him: “I am the way+ and the truth+ and the life.+ No one comes to the Father except through me.+  If you men had known me, you would have known my Father also;+ from this moment on you know him and have seen him.”+  Philip said to him: “Lord, show us the Father, and it is enough for us.”  Jesus said to him: “Even after I have been with you men for such a long time, Philip, have you not come to know me? Whoever has seen me has seen the Father also.+ How is it you say, ‘Show us the Father’? 10  Do you not believe that I am in union with the Father and the Father is in union with me?+ The things I say to you I do not speak of my own originality,+ but the Father who remains in union with me is doing his works. 11  Believe me that I am in union with the Father and the Father is in union with me; otherwise, believe because of the works themselves.+ 12  Most truly I say to you, whoever exercises faith in me will also do the works that I do; and he will do works greater than these,+ because I am going my way to the Father.+ 13  Also, whatever you ask in my name, I will do this, so that the Father may be glorified in connection with the Son.+ 14  If you ask anything in my name, I will do it. 15  “If you love me, you will observe my commandments.+ 16  And I will ask the Father and he will give you another helper to be with you forever,+ 17  the spirit of the truth,+ which the world cannot receive, because it neither sees it nor knows it.+ You know it, because it remains with you and is in you. 18  I will not leave you bereaved. I am coming to you.+ 19  In a little while the world will see me no more, but you will see me,+ because I live and you will live. 20  In that day you will know that I am in union with my Father and you are in union with me and I am in union with you.+ 21  Whoever has my commandments and observes them is the one who loves me. In turn, whoever loves me will be loved by my Father,+ and I will love him and will clearly show myself to him.” 22  Judas,+ not Is·carʹi·ot, said to him: “Lord, what has happened that you intend to show yourself clearly to us and not to the world?” 23  In answer Jesus said to him: “If anyone loves me, he will observe my word,+ and my Father will love him, and we will come to him and make our dwelling with him.+ 24  Whoever does not love me does not observe my words. The word that you are hearing is not mine, but belongs to the Father who sent me.+ 25  “I have spoken these things to you while I am still with you. 26  But the helper, the holy spirit, which the Father will send in my name, that one will teach you all things and bring back to your minds all the things I told you.+ 27  I leave you peace; I give you my peace.+ I do not give it to you the way that the world gives it. Do not let your hearts be troubled nor let them shrink out of fear. 28  You heard that I said to you, ‘I am going away and I am coming back to you.’ If you loved me, you would rejoice that I am going to the Father, for the Father is greater than I am.+ 29  So now I have told you before it occurs, so that you may believe when it does occur.+ 30  I will not speak with you much more, for the ruler of the world+ is coming, and he has no hold on me.+ 31  But for the world to know that I love the Father, I am doing just as the Father has commanded me to do.+ Get up, let us go from here.

Footnotes

Study Notes

dwelling places: Or “abodes.” The Greek word mo·neʹ occurs only here and at Joh 14:23, where it is rendered “dwelling.” Although the term was sometimes used in secular literature to refer to a stop or a resting place for a traveler on a journey, most scholars agree that in this context, Jesus was promising permanent dwelling places in the house of his Father in heaven, where he was going. For Jesus to prepare a place for his disciples required that he appear before God and present to Him the value of his blood. (Heb 9:12, 24-28) Only after he did that could humans follow him to heaven.—Php 3:20, 21.

prepare a place for you: This would involve Jesus’ validating or inaugurating the new covenant by appearing before God and presenting to Him the value of his blood. The preparation would also include Christ’s receiving kingly power, after which the heavenly resurrection of his anointed followers would begin.—1Th 4:14-17; Heb 9:12, 24-28; 1Pe 1:19; Re 11:15.

I am the way and the truth and the life: Jesus is the way because it is only through him that it is possible to approach God in prayer. He is also “the way” for humans to be reconciled to God. (Joh 16:23; Ro 5:8) Jesus is the truth in that he spoke and lived in harmony with truth. He also fulfilled scores of prophecies that show his central role in the outworking of God’s purpose. (Joh 1:14; Re 19:10) These prophecies became “‘yes’ [or were fulfilled] by means of him.” (2Co 1:20) Jesus is the life because by means of the ransom, he made it possible for mankind to gain “the real life,” that is, “everlasting life.” (1Ti 6:12, 19; Eph 1:7; 1Jo 1:7) He will also prove to be “the life” for millions who will be resurrected with the prospect of living in Paradise forever.—Joh 5:28, 29.

of my own originality: Or “on my own.” Lit., “from myself.” As God’s Chief Representative, Jesus always listens to Jehovah’s voice and speaks what Jehovah directs.

works greater than these: Jesus is not saying that the miraculous works his disciples would perform would be greater than his own miraculous works. Rather, he humbly acknowledges that the extent of their preaching and teaching work would be greater than his. His followers would cover more territory, reach more people, and preach for a longer period of time than he would. Jesus’ words clearly show that he expected his followers to continue his work.

ask: This reading is supported by some ancient manuscripts and agrees with the wording at Joh 15:16 and 16:23. Other ancient manuscripts read: “ask me.”

sees it . . . You know it: The two occurrences of “it” render the Greek pronoun au·toʹ, which is in the neuter gender and refers to the Greek word for spirit (pneuʹma), which is also in the neuter gender.—See study note on Joh 14:16.

spirit: Or “active force.” The Greek term pneuʹma is in the neuter gender and therefore neuter pronouns are used when referring to it. The Greek word has a number of meanings. All of them refer to that which is invisible to human sight and gives evidence of force in motion. (See Glossary.) In this context, “spirit” refers to God’s holy spirit, which is here called the spirit of the truth, an expression that also occurs at Joh 15:26 and 16:13, where Jesus explains that “the helper” (Joh 16:7), that is, “the spirit of the truth,” will “guide” Jesus’ disciples “into all the truth.”

another helper: This wording indicates that the disciples already had a “helper” in Jesus. In fact, 1Jo 2:1 used the same Greek term for “helper” (pa·raʹkle·tos) regarding the role of Jesus. But here Jesus promises that God’s spirit, or active force, would provide further help after his departure from the earthly scene.

helper: Or “comforter; encourager; advocate.” The word rendered “helper” (pa·raʹkle·tos) is used in the Bible to describe the roles of both the holy spirit (Joh 14:16, 26; 15:26; 16:7) and Jesus (1Jo 2:1). It could literally be rendered “one called to someone’s side” to give help. When Jesus spoke of the holy spirit, an impersonal force, as a helper and referred to this helper as ‘teaching,’ ‘bearing witness,’ ‘giving evidence,’ ‘guiding,’ ‘speaking,’ ‘hearing,’ and ‘receiving’ (Joh 14:26; 15:26; 16:7-15), he used a figure of speech called personification, that is, referring to something impersonal or inanimate as if it were alive. In the Scriptures, it is not unusual for something that is not actually a person to be personified. Some examples are wisdom, death, sin, and undeserved kindness. (Mt 11:19; Lu 7:35; Ro 5:14, 17, 21; 6:12; 7:8-11) It is obvious that not one of these things is an actual person. God’s spirit is often mentioned together with other impersonal forces or things, further supporting the fact that it is not a person. (Mt 3:11; Ac 6:3, 5; 13:52; 2Co 6:4-8; Eph 5:18) Some argue that the use of Greek masculine pronouns when referring to this “helper” shows that holy spirit is a person. (Joh 14:26) However, Greek grammar requires masculine pronouns when the activity of “the helper” is described, since the word for “helper” is in the masculine gender. (Joh 16:7, 8, 13, 14) On the other hand, when the neuter Greek word for “spirit” (pneuʹma) is used, neuter pronouns are used.—See study note on Joh 14:17.

helper: Or “comforter; encourager; advocate.” The word rendered “helper” (pa·raʹkle·tos) is used in the Bible to describe the roles of both the holy spirit (Joh 14:16, 26; 15:26; 16:7) and Jesus (1Jo 2:1). It could literally be rendered “one called to someone’s side” to give help. When Jesus spoke of the holy spirit, an impersonal force, as a helper and referred to this helper as ‘teaching,’ ‘bearing witness,’ ‘giving evidence,’ ‘guiding,’ ‘speaking,’ ‘hearing,’ and ‘receiving’ (Joh 14:26; 15:26; 16:7-15), he used a figure of speech called personification, that is, referring to something impersonal or inanimate as if it were alive. In the Scriptures, it is not unusual for something that is not actually a person to be personified. Some examples are wisdom, death, sin, and undeserved kindness. (Mt 11:19; Lu 7:35; Ro 5:14, 17, 21; 6:12; 7:8-11) It is obvious that not one of these things is an actual person. God’s spirit is often mentioned together with other impersonal forces or things, further supporting the fact that it is not a person. (Mt 3:11; Ac 6:3, 5; 13:52; 2Co 6:4-8; Eph 5:18) Some argue that the use of Greek masculine pronouns when referring to this “helper” shows that holy spirit is a person. (Joh 14:26) However, Greek grammar requires masculine pronouns when the activity of “the helper” is described, since the word for “helper” is in the masculine gender. (Joh 16:7, 8, 13, 14) On the other hand, when the neuter Greek word for “spirit” (pneuʹma) is used, neuter pronouns are used.—See study note on Joh 14:17.

spirit: Or “active force.” The Greek term pneuʹma is in the neuter gender and therefore neuter pronouns are used when referring to it. The Greek word has a number of meanings. All of them refer to that which is invisible to human sight and gives evidence of force in motion. (See Glossary.) In this context, “spirit” refers to God’s holy spirit, which is here called the spirit of the truth, an expression that also occurs at Joh 15:26 and 16:13, where Jesus explains that “the helper” (Joh 16:7), that is, “the spirit of the truth,” will “guide” Jesus’ disciples “into all the truth.”

sees it . . . You know it: The two occurrences of “it” render the Greek pronoun au·toʹ, which is in the neuter gender and refers to the Greek word for spirit (pneuʹma), which is also in the neuter gender.—See study note on Joh 14:16.

bereaved: Or “as orphans.” At Jas 1:27, the Greek word for “orphan,” or·pha·nosʹ, is used in the literal sense of someone being without parents. Here it has the figurative meaning of someone left without the support and protection of a friend, caretaker, or master. Jesus is promising his disciples that he will not leave them abandoned, helpless, or unprotected.

Thaddaeus: In the listings of the apostles at Lu 6:16 and Ac 1:13, the name Thaddaeus is not included; instead, we find “Judas the son of James,” leading to the conclusion that Thaddaeus is another name for the apostle whom John calls “Judas, not Iscariot.” (Joh 14:22) The possibility of confusing this Judas with the traitor, Judas Iscariot, might be a reason why the name Thaddaeus is sometimes used.

Judas, not Iscariot: Referring to the apostle Judas, also called Thaddaeus.—See study note on Mt 10:3.

dwelling places: Or “abodes.” The Greek word mo·neʹ occurs only here and at Joh 14:23, where it is rendered “dwelling.” Although the term was sometimes used in secular literature to refer to a stop or a resting place for a traveler on a journey, most scholars agree that in this context, Jesus was promising permanent dwelling places in the house of his Father in heaven, where he was going. For Jesus to prepare a place for his disciples required that he appear before God and present to Him the value of his blood. (Heb 9:12, 24-28) Only after he did that could humans follow him to heaven.—Php 3:20, 21.

dwelling: Or “abode.”—See study note on Joh 14:2.

helper: Or “comforter; encourager; advocate.” The word rendered “helper” (pa·raʹkle·tos) is used in the Bible to describe the roles of both the holy spirit (Joh 14:16, 26; 15:26; 16:7) and Jesus (1Jo 2:1). It could literally be rendered “one called to someone’s side” to give help. When Jesus spoke of the holy spirit, an impersonal force, as a helper and referred to this helper as ‘teaching,’ ‘bearing witness,’ ‘giving evidence,’ ‘guiding,’ ‘speaking,’ ‘hearing,’ and ‘receiving’ (Joh 14:26; 15:26; 16:7-15), he used a figure of speech called personification, that is, referring to something impersonal or inanimate as if it were alive. In the Scriptures, it is not unusual for something that is not actually a person to be personified. Some examples are wisdom, death, sin, and undeserved kindness. (Mt 11:19; Lu 7:35; Ro 5:14, 17, 21; 6:12; 7:8-11) It is obvious that not one of these things is an actual person. God’s spirit is often mentioned together with other impersonal forces or things, further supporting the fact that it is not a person. (Mt 3:11; Ac 6:3, 5; 13:52; 2Co 6:4-8; Eph 5:18) Some argue that the use of Greek masculine pronouns when referring to this “helper” shows that holy spirit is a person. (Joh 14:26) However, Greek grammar requires masculine pronouns when the activity of “the helper” is described, since the word for “helper” is in the masculine gender. (Joh 16:7, 8, 13, 14) On the other hand, when the neuter Greek word for “spirit” (pneuʹma) is used, neuter pronouns are used.—See study note on Joh 14:17.

helper: Or “comforter; encourager; advocate.” The word rendered “helper” (pa·raʹkle·tos) is used in the Bible to describe the roles of both the holy spirit (Joh 14:16, 26; 15:26; 16:7) and Jesus (1Jo 2:1). It could literally be rendered “one called to someone’s side” to give help. When Jesus spoke of the holy spirit, an impersonal force, as a helper and referred to this helper as ‘teaching,’ ‘bearing witness,’ ‘giving evidence,’ ‘guiding,’ ‘speaking,’ ‘hearing,’ and ‘receiving’ (Joh 14:26; 15:26; 16:7-15), he used a figure of speech called personification, that is, referring to something impersonal or inanimate as if it were alive. In the Scriptures, it is not unusual for something that is not actually a person to be personified. Some examples are wisdom, death, sin, and undeserved kindness. (Mt 11:19; Lu 7:35; Ro 5:14, 17, 21; 6:12; 7:8-11) It is obvious that not one of these things is an actual person. God’s spirit is often mentioned together with other impersonal forces or things, further supporting the fact that it is not a person. (Mt 3:11; Ac 6:3, 5; 13:52; 2Co 6:4-8; Eph 5:18) Some argue that the use of Greek masculine pronouns when referring to this “helper” shows that holy spirit is a person. (Joh 14:26) However, Greek grammar requires masculine pronouns when the activity of “the helper” is described, since the word for “helper” is in the masculine gender. (Joh 16:7, 8, 13, 14) On the other hand, when the neuter Greek word for “spirit” (pneuʹma) is used, neuter pronouns are used.—See study note on Joh 14:17.

that one: Both “that one” and “he” in verses 13 and 14 refer back to “the helper” mentioned at Joh 16:7. Jesus used “the helper” (which is in the masculine gender in Greek) as a personification of the holy spirit, an impersonal force, which is in the neuter gender in Greek.—See study note on Joh 14:16.

helper: Or “comforter; encourager; advocate.”—See study note on Joh 14:16.

that one: The Greek demonstrative pronoun e·keiʹnos is in the masculine gender and refers to the helper, which is also in the masculine gender in Greek.—See study notes on Joh 14:16; 16:13.

he has no hold on me: Or “he has no power over me.” Lit., “in me he has nothing.” Jesus had no imperfection or wrong desire that Satan could take advantage of so as to turn him away from serving God. The Greek expression rendered “has no hold on me” may reflect a Hebrew idiom used in legal contexts with the meaning “he has no claim on me.” By contrast, the Devil was able to enter into Judas and get a hold on him.—Joh 13:27.

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