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New World Translation of the Holy Scriptures (Study Edition)

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Translations and Reference Works Supporting the Use of the Divine Name in the “New Testament”

Below is a partial listing of Bible translations and reference works that have used some form of the divine name (or some other way of indicating that the divine name is referred to) in what is commonly called the New Testament. *

KEY:

  • HEBREW translation of the Christian Greek Scriptures

  • ENGLISH translation of the Christian Greek Scriptures

  • OTHER LANGUAGE translation of the Christian Greek Scriptures

  • REFERENCE works

J1

בשורת מתי, Euangelium Hebraicum Matthæi (Gospel of Matthew, in Hebrew), edited by Jean du Tillet, with a Latin translation by Jean Mercier, Paris, 1555. The translation into Hebrew uses יהוה or an abbreviated form of the Tetragrammaton in the main text of some verses. *

J2

Even Bohan (אבן בוחן, “Tested Stone; Touchstone”), by Shem-Tob ben Isaac Ibn Shaprut, Spain, c. 1385. This work includes a Hebrew text of the Gospel of Matthew. Edition: Hebrew Gospel of Matthew, by George Howard, Macon, GA, U.S.A., 1995. In this edition, the Hebrew text uses an abbreviated form of the Tetragrammaton in the main text of some verses. *

J3

תורת המשיח, Euangelium secundum Matthæum in lingua hebraica, cum versione latina (Gospel of Matthew, in Hebrew and Latin), by Sebastian Münster, Basel, 1537. The translation into Hebrew uses יהוה in the main text of some verses. *

תורת המשיח, Euangelium secundum Matthæum in lingua hebraica . . . Vnà cum Epistola D. Pauli ad Hebræos, Hebraicè & Latinè (Gospel of Matthew and Paul’s letter to the Hebrews, in Hebrew and Latin), by Sebastian Münster, Basel, 1557. The translation into Hebrew uses יהוה or an abbreviated form of the Tetragrammaton in the main text of some verses. *

J4

תורת המשיח . . . כפי מתי המבשר, Sanctum Domini nostri Iesu Christi Hebraicum Euangelium secundum Matthæum (Gospel of Matthew, in Hebrew), edited by Johannes Quinquarboreus, Paris, 1551. This translation uses יהוה in the main text of some verses. *

J5

בשורת הקרואות שנה בשנה בשבתות ובחגי, Euangelia anniuersaria, quae Dominicis diebus & in Sanctorum festis leguntur, Hebraicè conuersa (Liturgical Gospels, in Hebrew), by Fridericum Petri, Antwerp, 1581. This translation uses יהוה in the main text of some verses. *

J6

Euangelia anniuersaria Dominicorum et Festorum dierum, Germanicè, Latinè, Graecè, & Ebraicè (Liturgical Gospels, in German, Latin, Greek, and Hebrew), by Johannis Clajus, Leipzig, 1576. The translation into Hebrew uses יהוה in the main text of some verses. *

J7

Novum Testamentum Dn̄i: Nr̄i: Iesu Christi, Syriacè, Ebraicè, Græcè, Latinè, Germanicè, Bohemicè, Italicè, Hispanicè, Gallicè, Anglicè, Danicè, Polonicè (New Testament in 12 languages, including Hebrew), by Elias Hutter, Nuremberg, 1599-1600. This edition is often referred to as the Nuremberg Polyglot New Testament. The translation into Hebrew uses יהוה in the main text of various verses. *

J8

תורת יהוה חדשה, Lex Dei summi nova; Atque hæc est, Novum Domini nostri Jesu Christi Testamentum Sacro-Sanctum (New Testament, in Hebrew), by William Robertson, London, 1661. This translation uses יהוה in the main text of various verses. *

J9

ארבעה אבני הגיליונים מהתורה החדשה, Quatuor Euangelia Noui Testamenti Ex Latino in Hebraicum (The Four Gospels, in Hebrew and Latin), by Giovanni Battista Jona, Rome, 1668. The translation into Hebrew uses יהוה in the main text of various verses. *

J10

The New Testament . . . , in Hebrew and English, in Three Volumes, containing the Gospel of Matthew to First Corinthians, by Richard Caddick, London, 1798-1805. The translation into Hebrew uses יהוה in the main text of various verses. *

J11

ברית חדשה על פי משיח (New Testament, in Hebrew), by Thomas Fry and others, London, 1817. This translation uses יהוה in the main text of various verses. *

J12

ספר הברית החדשה (New Testament, in Hebrew), by William Greenfield, London, 1831. This translation uses יהוה in the main text of various verses. *

J13

הברית החדשה (New Testament, The Gospels in Hebrew), by Thomas Yeates, London, 1805. As reproduced by Jean Carmignac in Traductions hebraïques des Evangiles, Vols. 2-3, Turnhout, Belgium, 1982; from the manuscript Add MS 11659 in the British Library, London. This translation uses יהוה in the main text of various verses. *

J14

ספר ברית חדשה על פי המשיח (New Testament, in Hebrew), by Alexander McCaul, Michael Solomon Alexander, Johann Christian Reichardt, and Stanislaus Hoga, London, 1838. This translation uses יהוה in the main text of various verses. *

J15

ספר בשורה טובה על פי המבשר לוקס (Gospel of Luke, in Hebrew), by Johann Heinrich Raphael Biesenthal, Berlin, 1851. This translation uses יהוה in the main text of some verses. *

ספר פעלי השליחים (Acts of Apostles, in Hebrew), by Johann Heinrich Raphael Biesenthal, Berlin, 1867. This translation uses יהוה in the main text of some verses. *

אגרת אל הרומים (Paul’s Letter to the Romans, in Hebrew), by Johann Heinrich Raphael Biesenthal, Berlin, 1855. This translation uses יהוה in the main text of some verses. *

אגרת אל העברים (Paul’s Letter to the Hebrews, in Hebrew), by Johann Heinrich Raphael Biesenthal, Berlin, 1857. This translation uses יהוה in the main text of some verses. *

J16

הברית החדשה על פי המשיח עם נקודות וטעמים (New Testament, in Hebrew), revised by Johann Christian Reichardt and Johann Heinrich Raphael Biesenthal, London, 1866. This translation uses יהוה in the main text of various verses. *

J17

ספרי הברית החדשה (New Testament, in Hebrew), by Franz Delitzsch, Leipzig, 1877. This translation uses יהוה or an abbreviation of the Tetragrammaton in the main text of various verses. In 1892, Delitzsch’s 11th edition replaced the abbreviated form with יהוה, which is also used in later editions. *

J18

הברית החדשה (New Testament, in Hebrew), by Isaac Salkinson and Christian D. Ginsburg, Vienna, Austria, 1886. This translation uses יהוה in the main text in various verses. *

J19

הבשורה הטובה על־פי יוחנ (Gospel of John, in Hebrew), by Moshe I. Ben Maeir, Denver, CO, U.S.A., 1957. This translation uses יהוה or an abbreviated form of the Tetragrammaton in the main text of some verses. *

J20

A Concordance to the Greek Testament, by William F. Moulton and Alfred S. Geden, Edinburgh, Scotland, 1897. In the scripture references under the entries ΘΕΟ΄Σ (The·osʹ) and ΚΥ΄ΡΙΟΣ (Kyʹri·os), this work shows parts of the Hebrew text containing the Tetragrammaton (יהוה) to which the Greek text refers or from which it makes a quotation. *

J21

The Emphatic Diaglott (Greek-English interlinear), by Benjamin Wilson, New York, 1864. The translation into English in the right-hand column uses “Jehovah” in the main text of some verses. *

J22

ספרי הברית החדשה (New Testament, in Hebrew), by United Bible Societies, Jerusalem, 1976. This translation uses יהוה in the main text of various verses. *

J23

הברית החדשה (New Testament, in Hebrew), by Yohanan Bauchet and David Kinneret (Arteaga), Rome, 1975. This translation uses יהוה or an abbreviated form of the Tetragrammaton in the main text of various verses. *

J24

A Literal Translation of the New Testament . . . From the Text of the Vatican Manuscript, by Herman Heinfetter (pseudonym for Frederick Parker), Sixth Edition, London, 1863. This translation uses “Jehovah” in the main text of various verses. *

J25

St. Paul’s Epistle to the Romans, by William Gunion Rutherford, London, 1900. This translation uses “Jehovah” in the main text of some verses. *

J26

Psalterium Hebraicum (Bible book of Psalms and Gospel of Matthew 1:1–3:6, in Hebrew), by Anton Margaritha, Leipzig, 1533. This translation uses יהוה in the main text of some verses. *

J27

Die heilige Schrift des neuen Testaments (New Testament, in German), by Dominik von Brentano, Kempten, Germany, 1790-1791. This translation uses “Jehova” or “Jehovah” in the main text of various verses or in explanatory commentaries and paraphrases. *

J28

ספרי הברית החדשה (New Testament, in Hebrew), as appearing in The New Covenant Commonly Called the New Testament—Peshitta Aramaic Text With a Hebrew Translation, by The Bible Society, Jerusalem, 1986. The translation into Hebrew uses יהוה in the main text of various verses. *

J29

The Original Aramaic New Testament in Plain English (An American Translation of the Aramaic New Testament), by Glenn David Bauscher, Seventh Edition, Australia, 2012. This translation uses “THE LORD JEHOVAH” in the main text of various verses. *

J30

Aramaic English New Testament, by Andrew Gabriel Roth, Third Edition, U.S.A., 2008. This translation uses “Master YHWH” or “YHWH” in the main text of various verses or in the footnotes. *

J31

Hebraic Roots Bible—A Literal Translation (with study notes), Word of Truth Publications, U.S.A., 2012. This translation uses “YAHWEH” in the main text of various verses, both in the Hebrew Scriptures and in the Christian Greek Scriptures. *

J32

The Holy Name Bible (formerly known as The Sacred Name New Testament), revised by Angelo Benedetto Traina and The Scripture Research Association, Inc., U.S.A., 2012 reprint. This translation uses “Yahweh” in the main text of various verses, both in the Hebrew Scriptures and in the Christian Greek Scriptures. *

J33

The Christian’s Bible—New Testament, by George Newton LeFevre, Strasburg, PA, U.S.A., 1928. This translation uses “Jehovah” in the main text of various verses. *

J34

The Idiomatic Translation of the New Testament, by William Graham MacDonald, 2009 electronic version. This translation uses “Yahveh” in the main text of various verses. *

J35

Nkand’a Nzambi i sia vo Luwawanu Luankulu Y’olu Luampa (The Bible, in Kikongo), by George Ronald Robinson Cameron and others, 1926; reprinted by United Bible Societies, Nairobi, Kenya, 1987. This translation uses “Yave” in the main text of various verses, both in the Hebrew Scriptures and in the Christian Greek Scriptures. *

J36

Bibel Barita Na Uli Hata Batak-Toba siganup ari (The Bible, in Batak-Toba), Lembaga Alkitab Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia, 1989. This translation uses “Jahowa” in the main text of various verses, both in the Hebrew Scriptures and in the Christian Greek Scriptures. *

J37

Arorutiet ne Leel ne bo: Kiptaiyandennyo Jesu Kristo Yetindennyo (New Testament, in Kalenjin), by Frances J. Mumford and others, Nairobi, Kenya, 1968. This translation uses “Jehovah” in the main text of various verses. *

J38

Ekonejeu Kabesi ni Dokuj Iesu Keriso (New Testament, in Nengone), by Stephen M. Creagh and John Jones, London, 1870. This translation uses “Iehova” in the main text of various verses. *

J39

Jesu Keriso ve Evanelia Toaripi uri (The Four Gospels, in Toaripi), by J. H. Holmes, London, 1902. This translation uses “Jehova” in the main text of various verses. *

J40

Edisana Ñwed Abasi Ibom (The Bible, in Efik), reprinted by the National Bible Society of Scotland, Edinburgh, 1949. This translation uses “Jehovah” in the main text of various verses, both in the Hebrew Scriptures and in the Christian Greek Scriptures. *

J41

Testament Sefa an amam Samol o Rȧn Amanau Jisos Kraist: auili jonai kapas an re kris uili nanai kapas an mortlok (New Testament, in Mortlockese), by Robert W. Logan, New York, 1883. This translation uses “Jioua” in the main text of various verses. *

J42

The Gospel of Jesus Christ According to St. Matthew, Translated From the Original Into Temne, and Ama-Lémrane̱ Ama-Fu ma O̱-Rábbu de̱ O̱-Fū́tia-Ka-Su Yī́sua Masī́a (New Testament, in Temne), by Christian Friedrich Schlenker, London, 1865-1868. This translation uses “Yehṓfa” in the main text of various verses. *

J43

Testament Vau Ki Nawota Anigida Go Tea Maumaupauri Yesu Kristo (New Testament, in Nguna-Tongoa), British and Foreign Bible Society, London, 1912. This translation uses “Yehovah” in the main text of various verses. *

J44

Wusku Wuttestamentum Nul-Lordumun Jesus Christ (New Testament, in the Algonquin language of Massachusetts), by John Eliot, Cambridge, MA, U.S.A., 1661. This translation uses “Jehovah” in the main text of various verses. *

J45

Matīyū: Ku Nam Navosavos ugi (Gospel of Matthew, in Eromanga), by George Nicol Gordon and James Douglas Gordon, London, 1869. This translation uses “Iehōva” in the main text of various verses. *

J46

La Bible (The Bible, in French), by André Chouraqui, Belgium, 1985. This translation uses a combination of “IHVH” and “adonai” in the main text of various verses, both in the Hebrew Scriptures and in the Christian Greek Scriptures. *

J47

Biblia Peshitta en Español, Traducción de los Antiguos Manuscritos Arameos (The Peshitta Bible, in Spanish), Holman Bible Publishers, Nashville, TN, U.S.A., 2006. This translation uses “Yahweh” in the main text of various verses, both in the Hebrew Scriptures and in the Christian Greek Scriptures. *

J48

Pin chitokaka pi okchalinchi Chisvs Klaist in testament himona, chahta anumpa atoshowa hoke (New Testament, in Choctaw), by Alfred Wright and Cyrus Byington, New York, 1848. This translation uses “Chihowa” in the main text of various verses. *

J49

Bosakú-w’ólótsi wa Yesu Masiya boki Matayo la Malako o kótaka and Bosakú-w’ólótsi wa Yesu Masiya boki Luka o kótaka (Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke, in Lomóngo), by Edward Algernon Ruskin and Lily Ruskin, Congo Balolo Mission, Upper Congo, 1905. This translation uses “Yawe” in the main text of various verses. *

J50

Nalologena wo se Yesu Kristo Kome Mataio (Gospel of Matthew, in Tasiko, Epi), by Oscar Michelsen, London, 1892. This translation uses “Yehova” in the main text of various verses. *

J51

The Restored New Testament, by Willis Barnstone, New York, 2009. This translation uses “Yahweh” in some verses. A footnote at Matthew 1:20 comments on the expression “an angel of the Lord”: “From the Greek . . . (angelos kyriou), from the Hebrew . . . (malakh yahweh) . . . A literal rendering would be Yahweh’s malakh or ‘messenger.’” In the main text of Matthew 28:2, this translation reads: “An angel of Yahweh.” *

J52

Messianic Jewish Shared Heritage Bible, by The Messianic Jewish Family Bible Project, Shippensburg, PA, U.S.A., 2012. This Bible uses “ADONAI” in the main text of various verses in the Christian Greek Scriptures. The glossary on page 1530 explains: “ADONAI (יהוה)—Hebrew for ‘LORD.’ When written in small capitals, it refers to God’s personal name YHWH as given in the Hebrew Bible. This personal name is God’s ‘covenant name,’ used when God is relating to the Jewish people in an intimate way.” *

J53

The Messages of Jesus According to the Synoptists (The Discourses of Jesus in the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke), by Thomas Cuming Hall, New York, 1901. This paraphrase uses “Jehovah” in the main text of various verses. *

J54

Bibel Ñaran aen Gott, Ñarana Testament Õbwe me Testament Etsimeduw Õañan (The Bible, in Nauru), by Philip Adam Delaporte, New York, 1918; reprinted by The Bible Society in the South Pacific, Suva, Fiji, 2005. This translation uses “Jehova” in the main text of various verses, both in the Hebrew Scriptures and in the Christian Greek Scriptures. *

J55

Embimbiliya Li Kola (The Bible, in Umbundu), by Merlin W. Ennis and others, Luanda, Angola, 1963. This translation uses “Yehova” in the main text of various verses, both in the Hebrew Scriptures and in the Christian Greek Scriptures. *

J56

Ke Kauoha Hou a Ko Kakou Haku e Ola’i, a Iesu Kristo (New Testament, in Hawaiian), American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, Oahu, Hawaii, 1835. This translation uses “Iehova” in the main text of various verses. *

J57

Te Nu Tetemanti, ae ana Taeka Ara Uea ao ara Tia Kamaiu are Iesu Kristo, ae Kaetaki man Taetaen Erene (New Testament, in Kiribati [Gilbertese]), by Hiram Bingham II, New York, 1901. This translation uses “Iehova” in the main text of various verses. *

J58

Dal Co Mu Biale Saint Luke Terhu (Gospel of Luke, in Lonwolwol [Fanting]), by Robert Lamb, Dunedin, New Zealand, 1899. This translation uses “Jehovah” in the main text of various verses. *

J59

Intas-Etipup Mat u Iesu Kristo, Natimarid Uja, im Natimi Imyiatamaig Caija (New Testament, in Aneityum), by John Geddie, John Inglis, and others, London, 1863. This translation uses “Ihova” in the main text of various verses. *

J60

New Testament (in Cherokee), revised by Charles Cutler Torrey, New York, 1860. This translation uses “Yihowa” in the main text of various verses. *

J61

Ntestamente Yipia ya Nkambo Wetu ni Mupurushi Yesu Kristu (New Testament, in Chiluva), by Daniel Crawford, Livingstonia, Malawi, 1904. This translation uses “Yehova” in the main text of various verses. *

J62

Injili Mar Mathayo (Gospel of Matthew, in Dholuo), by A. A. Carscallen, London, 1914. This translation uses “Yawe” in the main text of at least one verse. *

J63

The Gospels of Matthew, and of Mark, Newly Rendered Into English; With Notes on the Greek Text, by Lancelot Shadwell, London, 1861. This translation uses “JEHOVAH” in the main text of various verses. *

J64

A Liberal Translation of the New Testament, by Edward Harwood, London, 1768. This translation uses “Jehovah” in the main text of various verses. *

J65

The Restoration of Original Sacred Name Bible, revised by Missionary Dispensary Bible Research, Buena Park, CA, U.S.A., 1970. This translation uses “YAHVAH” in the main text of various verses, both in the Hebrew Scriptures and in the Christian Greek Scriptures. *

J66

The Scriptures, by the Institute for Scripture Research, Third Edition, South Africa, 2010. This translation uses יהוה in the main text of various verses, both in the Hebrew Scriptures and in the Christian Greek Scriptures. *

J67

The New Testament Letters—Prefaced and Paraphrased, by John William Charles Wand, Melbourne, Australia, 1944. This paraphrase uses “Jehovah” in the main text of some verses. *

J68

The Messages of Paul (Arranged in Historical Order, Analyzed, and Freely Rendered in Paraphrase, with Introductions), by George Barker Stevens, New York, 1900. This paraphrase uses “Jehovah” in the main text of some verses. *

J69

The Epistle to the Hebrews with some interpretive suggestions, by Wilfrid H. Isaacs, London, 1933. This translation uses “Jehovah” in the main text of some verses. *

J70

The Apocalypse: A Revised Version in English, of the Revelation with Notes, Historical and Explanatory, by Edward Grimes, Newport-on-Usk, United Kingdom, 1891. This translation uses “Yahweh” in the main text of various verses. *

J71

The New Testament; Being the English Only of the Greek and English Testament, by Abner Kneeland, Philadelphia, PA, U.S.A., 1823. This translation uses “Jehovah” in the main text of various verses. *

J72

The Gospel of the Hellenists, by Benjamin Wisner Bacon and edited by Carl H. Kraeling, New York, 1933. This translation uses “Jehovah” in the main text of some verses. *

J73

The Family Expositor: or, A Paraphrase and Version of the New Testament; with Critical Notes, and a Practical Improvement of Each Section, by Philip Doddridge, London, 1739-1756. This paraphrase uses “Jehovah” in the main text of various verses. *

J74

The Modern American Bible—The Books of the Bible in Modern American Form and Phrase, With Notes and Introduction, by Frank Schell Ballentine, New York, 1899-1901. This translation of the Christian Greek Scriptures uses “Jehovah” in the main text of various verses. *

J75

The Guide to Immortality; or, Memoirs of the Life and Doctrine of Christ, by the Four Evangelists, by Robert Fellowes, London, 1804. This translation uses “Jehovah” in the main text of some verses or in the footnotes. *

J76

A New Version of the Four Gospels; with notes critical and explanatory, by a Catholic (John Lingard), London, 1836. This translation uses “The Lord (Jehova)” in the main text of Matthew 22:44. *

J77

The Documents of the New Testament, by George Woosung Wade, London, 1934. This translation uses “Jehovah” in the main text of some verses. *

J78

Studies in Matthew, by Benjamin Wisner Bacon, New York, 1930. This translation uses “Jehovah” in the main text of some verses. *

J79

The New Testament, in an Improved Version, Upon the Basis of Archbishop Newcome’s New Translation, edited by Thomas Belsham and others, London, 1808. This translation uses “Jehovah” in the main text of some verses or in the footnotes. *

J80

A New Family Bible, and Improved Version, From Corrected Texts of the Originals, by Benjamin Boothroyd, Huddersfield, England, 1824. This translation uses “Jehovah” in the main text of some verses or in the footnotes and explanatory commentaries, both in the Hebrew Scriptures and in the Christian Greek Scriptures. *

J81

The Holy Bible, Containing the Authorized Version of the Old and New Testaments, edited by John Tricker Conquest, London, 1841. This translation uses “JEHOVAH” in the main text of some verses, both in the Hebrew Scriptures and in the Christian Greek Scriptures. *

J82

A Paraphrase and Annotations Upon All the Books of the New Testament, by Henry Hammond, London, 1653. This paraphrase uses “Jehovah” in the main text of some verses. *

J83

The Epistle to the Hebrews, in a Paraphrastic Commentary, by Joseph B. M’Caul, London, 1871. This paraphrase uses “Jehovah” in the main text of some verses. *

J84

A Revised Translation and Interpretation of the Sacred Scriptures of the New Covenant, by John Mead Ray, Glasgow, Scotland, 1815. This translation uses “Jehovah” in the main text of some verses. *

J85

An Attempt Toward Revising Our English Translation of the Greek Scriptures, by William Newcome, Dublin, Ireland, 1796. This translation uses “Jehovah” in the main text of various verses. *

J86

The Monotessaron; or, The Gospel History, According to the Four Evangelists, by John S. Thompson, Baltimore, MD, U.S.A., 1829. This translation uses “Jehovah” or “JEHOVAH” in the main text of some verses. *

J87

A Translation of the New Testament, by Gilbert Wakefield, London, 1791. This translation uses “Jehovah” in the main text of some verses. *

J88

The Newberry Bible (commonly known as The Englishman’s Bible), by Thomas Newberry, London, 1890. In this translation, “LORD” appears in capital and small capitals in the main text of numerous verses, with marginal notes drawing attention to the divine name “Jehovah,” both in the Hebrew Scriptures and in the Christian Greek Scriptures. *

J89

The Messages of the Apostles (The Apostolic Discourses in the Book of Acts and the General and Pastoral Epistles of the New Testament), by George Barker Stevens, New York, 1900. This paraphrase uses “Jehovah” in the main text of various verses. *

J90

A Non-Ecclesiastical New Testament, by Frank Daniels, 2016. This translation uses “Yahweh” in the main text of various verses. In the opening comments by the translator, the following statement is made under the heading “The Divine Name”: “In every case where the Tetragrammaton appeared in a quotation from the Hebrew Bible (rendered Κυριος [Lord] in the LXX), this translation employs the proper name, Yahweh. There are also other places in the NT [New Testament] where Κυριος without an article indicates the divine name. In these cases, too, the form Yahweh is employed.” *

J91

Uebersetzung des Neuen Testaments mit erklärenden Anmerkungen (New Testament, in German), by Johann Babor, Vienna, Austria, 1805. This translation uses “Jhova” in the main text of some verses or in the footnotes. *

J92

Nsango ea Ndoci eki Malako o Kotaka (Gospel of Mark, in Mongo-Nkundu), by Ellsworth E. Harris and Royal J. Dye, Bolengi, Upper Congo, 1905. This translation uses “Yawe” in the main text of some verses. *

J93

Aramaic Peshitta New Testament Translation, by Janet M. Magiera, Truth or Consequences, NM, U.S.A., 2006. This translation uses “LORD” in the main text of various verses. The introduction states: “LORD is MARYA, meaning LORD of the Old Testament, YAHWEH.” *

J94

The Orthodox Jewish Bible, by Phillip E. Goble, Fourth Edition, New York, 2011. This Bible uses “Hashem” in the main text of various verses, both in the Hebrew Scriptures and in the Christian Greek Scriptures. The term “Hashem” comes from the Hebrew expression hash·Shemʹ, meaning “the Name,” often used by Jews as a substitute for YHWH. *

J95

Pacto Mesiánico (New Testament, in Spanish), by Academia Bíblica BEREA, Argentina, 2010. This translation uses “YHWH” in the main text of numerous verses. *

J96

El Nuevo Testamento de Nuestro Señor Jesucristo (New Testament, in Spanish), by Pablo Besson, Second Edition, Buenos Aires, Argentina, 1948. This translation uses “Jehová” at Luke 2:15 and Jude 14. When “Señor” is used in the main text, a footnote referring to “Jehová,” “Yahvé,” or “Jahvé” appears in various verses. *

J97

Livangeli tsa Yesu-Kereste Morena oa rona tse ’ngoliloeng ki Mareka le Yoanne (Luke 1:5–2:17, 40-52, Matthew 2:1-21, and Gospels of Mark and John, in Sesotho), by Eugène Casalis and Samuel Rolland, Cape Town, South Africa, 1839. This translation uses “Yehofa” in the main text of some verses. *

J98

The Four Gospels, Translated From the Greek, by George Campbell, London, 1789. This translation uses “Lord” in the main text with a footnote referring to “Jehovah” in various verses. *

J99

Nam Numpusok Itevau eni Iesu Kristo Novsuromon Enugkos (New Testament, in Eromanga), by H. A. Robertson, Sydney, Australia, 1909. This translation uses “Iēhōva” in the main text of various verses. *

J100

The Book of Yahweh—The Holy Scriptures, by Yisrayl B. Hawkins, Ninth Edition, Abilene, TX, U.S.A., 1996. This translation uses “Yahweh” in the main text of numerous verses, both in the Hebrew Scriptures and in the Christian Greek Scriptures. *

J101

The Sacred Scriptures, by Assemblies of Yahweh, Bethel, PA, U.S.A., 1981. This translation uses “Yahweh” in the main text of numerous verses, both in the Hebrew Scriptures and in the Christian Greek Scriptures. *

J102

A Critical and Emphatic Paraphrase of the New Testament, by Vincent T. Roth, Pasadena, CA, U.S.A., 2000; reproduced from the revised edition originally published in 1963. This paraphrase uses “JEHOVAH” in the main text of various verses. *

J103

Neues Testament mit Anmerkungen (New Testament, in German), by Heinz Schumacher, Germany, 2002. This translation uses “JAHWE” in the main text or in the footnotes of various verses. *

J104

Das Neue Testament (New Testament, in German), by Adolf Pfleiderer, Langensteinbach, Germany, 2004; reproduced from a copy first printed in 1980. This translation uses “Jehova” in the main text of various verses. *

J105

Sämtliche Schriften des neuen Testaments (New Testament, in German), by Johann Jakob Stolz, Second Edition, Zürich, Switzerland, 1795. This translation uses “Jehovah” in the main text of various verses. *

J106

Biblia, Das ist: Alle bücher der H. Schrift des alten und newen Testaments (The Bible, in German), edited by Johannes Piscator, Herborn, Germany, 1602-1604. This translation uses “HERR” in the main text with explanatory commentaries referring to “JEHOVAH,” “Jehováh,” or “Jehovah” in various verses, both in the Hebrew Scriptures and in the Christian Greek Scriptures. *

J107

Neue Uebersetzung der Apostelgeschichte (Acts of Apostles, in German), Halle, Germany, 1779. This translation uses “Jehovah” or “Jehoven” in the main text of some verses. *

J108

Die heiligen Schriften des neuen Testaments (New Testament, in German), by Sebastian Mutschelle, München, Germany, 1789-1790. This translation uses “Jehova” or “Jehovah” in the main text of some verses. *

J109

A New Translation of the New Testament . . . Extracted From the Paraphrase of the Late Philip Doddridge . . . and Carefully Revised With an Introduction and Notes, by Samuel Palmer, London, 1765. This translation uses “Jehovah” in the main text of some verses. *

J110

The Evangelical Expositor: or, A Commentary on the Holy Bible. Wherein the Sacred Text of the Old and New Testament Is Inserted at Large . . . With Practical Observations, by Thomas Haweis, London, 1765. This translation uses “JEHOVAH” in the main text of some verses in the Hebrew Scriptures. When “LORD” or “Lord” is used in the main text, an explanatory commentary referring to “Jehovah” appears in some verses, both in the Hebrew Scriptures and in the Christian Greek Scriptures. *

J111

A New and Corrected Version of the New Testament . . . to Which Are Subjoined a Few, Generally Brief, Critical, Explanatory, and Practical Notes, by Rodolphus Dickinson, Boston, MA, U.S.A., 1833. This translation uses “Jehovah” in the main text of some verses or in explanatory notes. *

J112

Evangelical History: or a Narrative of the Life, Doctrines and Miracles of Jesus Christ . . . Containing the Four Gospels and the Acts, by Alden Bradford, Boston, MA, U.S.A., 1813. This translation uses “Jehovah” in the main text of some verses. In 1836, Bradford published a revision of the Gospels, which uses “JEHOVAH” or “Jehovah” in the main text of additional verses or in explanatory notes. *

J113

The New Testament of Our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ . . . by a Layman (Edgar Taylor), London, 1840. This translation uses “Jehovah” at Acts 7:49. When “LORD” or “Lord” is used in the main text, a footnote referring to “Jehovah” appears in various verses. Regarding the word Kyʹri·os, the preface states: “This word is well known to be used both in the Old and New Testaments as a term of distinction or courtesy in addressing a superior . . . It is also applied in a higher sense even to the Supreme Being, having been used in the LXX. [Septuagint] to represent the Hebrew ‘Jehovah’.” *

J114

The New Covenant, Reference Edition, edited by R. B. Banfield, 1995. This translation uses “LORD” in the main text of various verses. In the “Notes About This Translation,” the editor explains: “The word Lord is rendered LORD where applicable in Old Testament quotes. Where Lord is rendered as LORD elsewhere it is merely speculative and not intended as theological statement. In the Old Testament LORD is the Hebrew YHWH and Lord the Hebrew Adonai, both words are Kurios in the Greek, and agreement as to whether it should be capitalised here as the definitive divine name of God, or left as the common name for merely a master, can be left to the reader’s personal judgement.” *

J115

The Restored Name King James Version, edited by Richard Lattier, 2001. This translation uses “YHWH” in the main text of numerous verses, both in the Hebrew Scriptures and in the Christian Greek Scriptures. The “Introduction” states: “In the text of the Restored Name King James Version, the name of the Heavenly Father, יהוה, has been written “YHWH”, which is the transliteration of the Hebrew letters. . . . It is our hope that the restoration of the name of the Almighty Creator . . . will bless the reader to live a life in reverence to יהוה.” *

J116

One Unity Resource Bible . . . With Some Transliterated Hebrew Notations, by Thomas Robinson, 2016. This translation uses “ADONAI,” “Yahweh,” or “MarYah [Master Yahweh]” in the main text of various verses, both in the Hebrew Scriptures and in the Christian Greek Scriptures. The appendix on page 705 explains that the Hebrew word “Yahweh” corresponds to the English translation “LORD, GOD, The LORD, ADONAI, Jehovah.” *

J117

The Complete Jewish Study Bible, by David H. Stern, Peabody, MA, U.S.A., 2016. This translation uses “ADONAIin the main text of various verses, both in the Hebrew Scriptures and in the Christian Greek Scriptures. In the introduction to this Bible, the translator explains: “Most English translations represent the Name by ‘LORD,’ written as it is here, in large and small capital letters. More than six thousand times, the Complete Jewish Bible uses the Hebrew word ‘ADONAIalso in large and small capital letters (and italicized, like other Hebrew words) to represent the tetragrammaton.” Under the heading “The Tetragrammaton in the New Testament,” he adds: “The word ‘ADONAIis used . . . wherever I, as the translator, believe kurios is the Greek representation of the tetragrammaton.” *

J118

Ai Vola ni Veiyalayalati Vou i Jisu Karisito (New Testament, in Fijian), revised and edited by James Calvert, London, 1858; published with Ai Vola Tabu, a ya e tu kina Na Veiyalayalati Makawa (Old Testament, in Fijian), revised and edited by James Calvert and Richard Burdsall Lyth, London, 1864. This translation uses “Jiova” in the main text of various verses, both in the Hebrew Scriptures and in the Christian Greek Scriptures. *

J119

Buk Baibel (The Bible, in Motu), by the Bible Society of Papua New Guinea, 1959-1973. This translation uses “Iehova” or “IEHOVA” in the main text of some verses, both in the Hebrew Scriptures and in the Christian Greek Scriptures. *

J120

Ko e Tohi Tapu Kātoa (The Bible [Revised West Version], in Tongan), by James Baxley, 2018. This translation uses “Sihova” or “SIHOVA” in the main text of various verses, both in the Hebrew Scriptures and in the Christian Greek Scriptures. *

J121

Testamente e Ncha ea Morena le Moluki oa Rona Yesu Kreste (New Testament, in Sesotho), by Eugène Casalis and Samuel Rolland, Beerseba, Lesotho, 1855. This translation uses “Yehofa” in the main text of some verses. *

J122

Vanuvei Eo e sepinien Vatlongos na mol-Vatimol xil niutestamen e rute te oltestamen (New Testament, Ruth, and Jonah, in Southeast Ambrym), by Wycliffe Bible Translators, Inc., 2015. This translation uses “Iahova” in the main text of various verses, both in the Hebrew Scriptures and in the Christian Greek Scriptures. *

J123

Yesu Keriso da Bino Dave (Mark, Luke, and Acts of Apostles, in Binandere), by Wycliffe Bible Translators, Inc., 2014. This translation uses “BADARI” in the main text with a footnote referring to “Jehovah” in some verses. *

J124

The New Testament in Braid Scots, by William Wye Smith, Paisley, Scotland, 1901. This translation uses “Jehovah” in the main text of some verses. *

J125

Loina Hauhauna (New Testament, in Bunama), by Wycliffe Bible Translators, Inc., 2015; originally published by The Bible Society of Papua New Guinea, Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea, 1991. This translation uses “Yehoba” in the main text of various verses. *

J126

Dakota wowapi wakan kin and Wicoicage wowapi, mowis owa: qa wicoie wakan kin, Salomon Kaga pejihuta wicaśta (New Testament, Genesis, and Proverbs, in Dakota), by Stephen R. Riggs and Thomas S. Williamson, New York, 1865. This translation uses “Jehowa” in the main text of some verses, both in the Hebrew Scriptures and in the Christian Greek Scriptures. *

J127

Nsango Yandoci yo kotamaki la Luka (Gospel of Luke, in [Lu]Nkundu), by John McKittrick and Mrs. F. T. McKittrick, Congo Balolo Mission, Bonginda, Congo, 1895. This translation uses “Yova” in the main text of some verses. *

J128

Kálaad Zɛmbî: Sɔ̧ á Gúgwáan (New Testament, in Makaa), by Wycliffe Bible Translators, Inc., 2014. This translation uses “Yawé” in the main text of various verses or in the footnotes. *

J129

Pulu Yili-nga Ung Konale (New Testament, in Bo-Ung [Mara-Gomu]), by Wycliffe Bible Translators, Inc., 2004. This translation uses “Yawe” in the main text of various verses. *

J130

Nzryrngrkxtr Kc Ate: Rut x Sam (New Testament, Ruth, and Psalms, in Natügu), by the Bible Society of the South Pacific, Solomon Islands Translation Advisory Group, and Wycliffe Bible Translators, Inc., 2008. This translation uses “Yawe” in the main text of various verses, both in the Hebrew Scriptures and in the Christian Greek Scriptures. The appendix on page 530 indicates that “Yawe (Yahweh)” corresponds to the Greek “kurios” and “the LORD” in English. *

J131

Kaem Ko Den (New Testament and portions of the Old Testament, in Waskia), revised by The Bible Society of Papua New Guinea and Wycliffe Bible Translators, 2014. This translation uses “Yawe” in the main text of various verses, both in the Hebrew Scriptures and in the Christian Greek Scriptures. The appendix on pages 726 and 727 indicates that “Jawe” (or, “Yawe”) corresponds to “JHWH” in Hebrew, “Kurios” in Greek, and “LORD, Jahweh, Jehovah” in English. *

J132

Buka Vivivireina Parivainuaḡana Wadubona Ḡuta Vinevine ma Mark ma Acts (portions of the Old Testament, Mark, and Acts of Apostles, in Wedau), by Wycliffe Bible Translators, Inc., 2010. This translation uses “BADA” in the main text of various verses, both in the Hebrew Scriptures and in the Christian Greek Scriptures. In a footnote at Genesis 2:7, “BADA” is explained as referring to “Yahweh” or “Jehovah.” *

J133

Tus Votut en selusien ten out Voum niutestamen ka tei en oltestamen (portions of the Bible, in Paama), by Wycliffe Bible Translators, Inc., 2015. This translation uses “Iahova” in the main text of various verses, both in the Hebrew Scriptures and in the Christian Greek Scriptures. *

J134

Te akʼaʼj tuʼjal tuj tuʼjal qtata Dios (New Testament, in Tektiteko), by Wycliffe Bible Translators, Inc., 2003. This translation uses “Dios” in the main text with a footnote referring to “YHWH” or “Yawe” in some verses. *

^ par. 3 Also called the Christian Greek Scriptures.

^ par. 52 REFERENCE works