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Jehovah’s Witnesses

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AWAKE! MAY 2014

 THE BIBLE’S VIEWPOINT

Meditation

Meditation

What is meditation?

“I will meditate on all your activity and ponder over your dealings.”Psalm 77:12.

WHAT PEOPLE SAY

Meditation takes many forms, a number of which have roots in ancient Eastern religions. “The mind has to be empty to see clearly,” said one writer on the subject. His words reflect the view that emptying the mind while focusing on certain words or images promotes inner peace, mental clarity, and spiritual enlightenment.

WHAT THE BIBLE SAYS

The Bible puts a high value on meditation. (1 Timothy 4:15, footnote) The kind of meditation that it encourages, however, does not entail emptying the mind or repeating a certain word or phrase, sometimes called a mantra. Rather, Biblical meditation involves purposeful thinking on wholesome topics, such as God’s qualities, standards, and creations. “I meditate on all your activity; I eagerly ponder over the work of your hands,” prayed a faithful man of God. (Psalm 143:5) He also said: “I remember you while upon my bed; I meditate on you during the watches of the night.”Psalm 63:6.

 How can meditation benefit you?

“The heart of the righteous one meditates before answering.”Proverbs 15:28.

WHAT THE BIBLE SAYS

Wholesome meditation gives us inner depth, quiet reserve, and moral strength—all of which add insight and understanding to our speech and behavior. (Proverbs 16:23) Such meditation, therefore, also contributes to a happy and rewarding life. Concerning the person who regularly meditates on God, Psalm 1:3 states: “He will be like a tree planted by streams of water, a tree that produces fruit in its season, the foliage of which does not wither. And everything he does will succeed.”

Meditation also helps us to improve our comprehension and memory. To illustrate, when we study an aspect of creation or a certain Bible topic, we learn many interesting facts. But when we meditate on those facts, we see how they relate to one another and to what we have learned in the past. Thus, just as a carpenter turns raw materials into an attractive building, meditation enables us to “assemble” facts into a coherent pattern or structure.

Should meditation be properly directed?

“The heart is more treacherous than anything else and is desperate. Who can know it?”Jeremiah 17:9.

WHAT THE BIBLE SAYS

“From inside, out of the heart of men, come injurious reasonings, sexual immorality, thefts, murders, acts of adultery, greed, acts of wickedness, deceit, brazen conduct, an envious eye, . . . and unreasonableness.” (Mark 7:21, 22) Yes, like a fire, meditation must be controlled! Otherwise, improper thoughts could nurture hurtful desires that might race out of control and lead to evil deeds.James 1:14, 15.

Accordingly, the Bible encourages us to meditate on ‘things that are true, righteous, pure, lovable, well-spoken-of, virtuous, and praiseworthy.’ (Philippians 4:8, 9; footnote) When we take in such fine thoughts and “sow” them in our mind, we will reap in the form of beautiful qualities, gracious speech, and warm relationships with others.Colossians 4:6.