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Jehovah’s Witnesses

English
New World Translation of the Holy Scriptures (Study Edition)

According to Luke 24:1-53

24  But on the first day of the week, they came very early to the tomb, bringing the spices they had prepared.+  But they found the stone rolled away from the tomb,+  and when they entered, they did not find the body of the Lord Jesus.+  While they were perplexed about this, look! two men in shining garments stood by them.  The women became frightened and kept their faces turned toward the ground, so the men said to them: “Why are you looking for the living one among the dead?+  He is not here, but has been raised up. Recall how he spoke to you while he was yet in Galʹi·lee,  saying that the Son of man must be handed over to sinful men and be executed on the stake and on the third day rise.”+  Then they remembered his words,+  and they returned from the tomb* and reported all these things to the Eleven and to all the rest.+ 10  They were Mary Magʹda·lene, Jo·anʹna, and Mary the mother of James. Also, the rest of the women+ with them were telling these things to the apostles. 11  However, these sayings seemed like nonsense to them, and they would not believe the women. 12  But Peter got up and ran to the tomb,* and stooping forward, he saw only the linen cloths. So he went off, wondering to himself what had occurred. 13  But look! on that very day, two of them were traveling to a village named Em·maʹus, about seven miles from Jerusalem, 14  and they were conversing with each other about all these things that had happened. 15  Now as they were conversing and discussing these things, Jesus himself approached and began walking with them, 16  but their eyes were kept from recognizing him.+ 17  He said to them: “What are these matters that you are debating between yourselves as you walk along?” And they stood still, looking sad. 18  In answer the one named Cleʹo·pas said to him: “Are you a stranger dwelling alone in Jerusalem and do not know* the things that have occurred there during these days?” 19  He asked them: “What things?” They said to him: “The things concerning Jesus the Naz·a·reneʹ,+ who proved to be a prophet powerful in deed and word before God and all the people;+ 20  and how our chief priests and rulers handed him over to be sentenced to death,+ and they nailed him to the stake.+ 21  But we were hoping that this man was the one who was going to deliver Israel.+ Yes, and besides all these things, this is the third day since these things occurred. 22  Moreover, some women from among us also astonished us, for they went early to the tomb*+ 23  and when they did not find his body, they came saying that they had also seen a supernatural sight of angels, who said he is alive. 24  Then some of those who were with us went off to the tomb,*+ and they found it just as the women had said, but they did not see him.” 25  So he said to them: “O senseless ones and slow of heart to believe all the things the prophets have spoken! 26  Was it not necessary for the Christ to suffer these things+ and to enter into his glory?”+ 27  And starting with Moses and all the Prophets,+ he interpreted to them things pertaining to himself in all the Scriptures. 28  Finally they got close to the village to which they were traveling, and he made as if to travel on farther. 29  But they urged him to remain, saying: “Stay with us, because it is almost evening and the day is nearly over.” With that he went in to stay with them. 30  And as he was dining* with them, he took the bread, blessed it, broke it, and began handing it to them.+ 31  At that their eyes were fully opened and they recognized him; but he disappeared from them.+ 32  And they said to each other: “Were not our hearts burning within us as he was speaking to us on the road, as he was fully opening up* the Scriptures to us?” 33  And they got up in that very hour and returned to Jerusalem, and they found the Eleven and those assembled together with them, 34  who said: “For a fact the Lord was raised up, and he appeared to Simon!”+ 35  Then they related the events on the road and how he became known to them by the breaking of the bread.+ 36  While they were speaking of these things, he himself stood in their midst and said to them: “May you have peace.”+ 37  But because they were terrified and frightened, they imagined that they were seeing a spirit.+ 38  So he said to them: “Why are you troubled, and why have doubts come up in your hearts? 39  See my hands and my feet, that it is I myself; touch me and see, for a spirit does not have flesh and bones just as you see that I have.” 40  And as he said this, he showed them his hands and his feet. 41  But while they were still not believing for sheer joy and amazement, he said to them: “Do you have something there to eat?”+ 42  So they handed him a piece of broiled fish, 43  and he took it and ate it before their eyes. 44  He then said to them: “These are my words that I spoke to you while I was yet with you,+ that all the things written about me in the Law of Moses and in the Prophets and Psalms must be fulfilled.”+ 45  Then he opened up their minds fully to grasp the meaning of the Scriptures,+ 46  and he said to them, “This is what is written: that the Christ would suffer and rise from among the dead on the third day,+ 47  and on the basis of his name, repentance for forgiveness of sins+ would be preached in all the nations+—starting out from Jerusalem.+ 48  You are to be witnesses of these things.+ 49  And look! I am sending upon you what my Father promised. You, though, stay in the city until you are clothed with power from on high.”+ 50  Then he led them out as far as Bethʹa·ny, and he lifted up his hands and blessed them. 51  As he was blessing them, he was parted from them and taken up to heaven.+ 52  And they did obeisance to him and returned to Jerusalem with great joy.+ 53  And they were continually in the temple, praising God.+

Footnotes

Or “memorial tomb.”
Or “memorial tomb.”
Or possibly, “Are you the only visitor in Jerusalem who does not know . . . ?”
Or “memorial tomb.”
Or “memorial tomb.”
Or “reclining at the table.”
Or “clearly explaining.”

Study Notes

the first day of the week: That is, Nisan 16. For the Jews, the day immediately after the Sabbath was the first day of the week.

tomb: Or “memorial tomb.” A vault, or chamber, cut into the soft limestone rock, rather than a natural cave. Such tombs often contained benchlike shelves or niches where bodies could be laid.—See Glossary, “Memorial tomb.”

of the Lord Jesus: Some manuscripts do not include these words, but the longer reading has strong support in early authoritative manuscripts.

He is not here, but has been raised up: Some manuscripts do not include these words, but they have strong support in early authoritative manuscripts.

executed on a stake: Or “to be fastened on a stake (pole).” This is the first of over 40 occurrences of the Greek verb stau·roʹo in the Christian Greek Scriptures. This is the verb for the Greek noun stau·rosʹ, rendered “torture stake.” (See study notes on Mt 10:38; 16:24; 27:32 and Glossary, “Stake”; “Torture stake.”) The verb form is used in the Septuagint at Es 7:9, where the order was given to hang Haman on a stake that was over 20 m (65 ft) tall. In classical Greek, it meant “to fence with pales, to form a stockade, or palisade.”

executed on the stake: Or “fastened on a stake (pole).”—See study note on Mt 20:19 and Glossary, “Stake”; “Torture stake.”

from the tomb: Some manuscripts do not include these words, but they have strong support in early authoritative manuscripts.

. . . what had occurred: Some manuscripts do not include the words of this verse, but the verse has strong support in early authoritative manuscripts.

about seven miles: About 11 km. Lit., “60 stadia.” A Roman stadium equaled 185 m (606.95 ft).—See Glossary, “Mile,” and App. B14.

interpreted: The Greek word di·er·me·neuʹo can be used in the sense “to translate from one language to another.” (Ac 9:36; 1Co 12:30, ftn.) However, it also signifies “to clarify the meaning; to explain fully.” In this verse, it refers to interpreting the meaning of prophecies.

within us: Some early manuscripts do not include these words, but they are included in other early authoritative manuscripts.

and said to them: “May you have peace”: Some manuscripts do not include these words, but they have strong support in early authoritative manuscripts.

a spirit: Although the Greek word pneuʹma can refer to invisible spirit persons, the disciples were evidently using the term to refer to an apparition or a vision. Jesus showed the disciples his hands and feet and told them: “Touch me and see, for a spirit does not have flesh and bones just as you see that I have.” (Lu 24:39) This was to prove that like angels in the past, he had materialized in order to be seen by the disciples.—Ge 18:1-8; 19:1-3.

my hands and my feet: As in Jesus’ case, nailing the hands (and likely the feet also) of the accused to a stake was customary among the Romans. (Ps 22:16; Joh 20:25, 27; Col 2:14) Some scholars believe that a nail or nails pierced Jesus’ feet, fixing them directly to the stake or to a small platform attached to the stake.

. . . and his feet: Some manuscripts do not include the words of this verse, but the verse has strong support in early authoritative manuscripts.

fish: Some later manuscripts add the words “and a honeycomb,” but early authoritative manuscripts do not include these words.

in the Law of Moses and in the Prophets and Psalms: Jesus was here evidently grouping the entire inspired Hebrew Scriptures in the way adopted by the Jews and known to them. “The Law” (Hebrew, Toh·rahʹ) refers to the Bible books of Genesis through Deuteronomy. “The Prophets” (Hebrew, Nevi·ʼimʹ) refers to the prophetic books of the Hebrew Scriptures, including the so-called Former Prophets (the Bible books of Joshua through Kings). “Psalms” refers to the third section, which contains the remaining books of the Hebrew Scriptures and is called the Writings, or in Hebrew, Kethu·vimʹ. The designation “Psalms” is used because it was the first book of the third section. The term “Tanakh,” a Jewish designation for the Hebrew Scriptures, comes from combining the first letter of each of these three sections (TaNaKh). Jesus’ use of these three terms indicates that the canon of the Hebrew Scriptures was well-established when he was on earth and was approved by him.

the city: That is, Jerusalem.

and taken up to heaven: Some manuscripts do not include these words, but the words do have strong support in early authoritative manuscripts. Also, Luke indicated at Ac 1:1, 2 that in his “first account,” namely, his Gospel, he had discussed what Jesus had done in his life and ministry “until the day that he [Jesus] was taken up.” So it is quite appropriate that in his inspired account, Luke would have included these words about Jesus’ ascension to heaven.

do obeisance: Or “bow down.” When the Greek verb pro·sky·neʹo is used to refer to the worship of a god or a deity, it is rendered “to worship.” In this context, however, the astrologers were asking for “the one born king of the Jews.” So it is clear that it refers to obeisance or homage to a human king, not a god. A similar usage is found at Mr 15:18, 19, where the term is used of the soldiers who mockingly “bowed down” to Jesus and called him “King of the Jews.”—See study note on Mt 18:26.

did obeisance to him: Or “bowed down to him; honored him.” People mentioned in the Hebrew Scriptures also bowed down when meeting prophets, kings, or other representatives of God. (1Sa 25:23, 24; 2Sa 14:4-7; 1Ki 1:16; 2Ki 4:36, 37) This man evidently recognized that he was talking to a representative of God who had power to heal people. It was appropriate to bow down to show respect for Jehovah’s King-Designate.Mt 9:18; for more information on the Greek word used here, see study note on Mt 2:2.

did obeisance to him: Or “bowed down to him; paid him homage.” These people recognized Jesus as God’s representative. They rendered obeisance to him, not as to a god or a deity, but as to “God’s Son.”—See study notes on Mt 2:2; 8:2; 18:26.

did obeisance to him: Or “bowed down to him; paid him homage.” By calling Jesus “Son of David” (Mt 15:22), this non-Jewish woman evidently recognizes him as the promised Messiah. She renders obeisance to him, not as to a god or a deity, but as to a representative of God.—See study notes on Mt 2:2; 8:2; 14:33; 18:26.

did obeisance to him: Or “bowed down to him; prostrated themselves to him; paid him homage.” When the Greek verb pro·sky·neʹo is used to refer to the worship of a god or a deity, it is rendered “to worship.” (Mt 4:10; Lu 4:8) In this context, however, the disciples recognized the resurrected Jesus as God’s representative. They rendered obeisance to him, not as to God or a deity, but as to “God’s Son,” the foretold “Son of man,” the Messiah with divine authority. (Lu 1:35; Mt 16:13-16; Joh 9:35-38) This was similar to the way that people mentioned in the Hebrew Scriptures bowed down when meeting prophets, kings, or other representatives of God. (1Sa 25:23, 24; 2Sa 14:4; 1Ki 1:16; 2Ki 4:36, 37) On many occasions, the obeisance done to Jesus expressed gratitude for divine revelation or evidence of divine favor.—See study notes on Mt 2:2; 8:2; 14:33; 15:25.

did obeisance to him and: Some manuscripts do not include these words, but the words do have strong support in early authoritative manuscripts.

Media

Nail in a Heel Bone
Nail in a Heel Bone

This is a photograph of a replica of a human heel bone pierced by an iron nail that was 11.5 cm (4.5 in.) long. The original artifact was found in 1968, during excavations in northern Jerusalem, and dates to Roman times. It provides archaeological evidence that nails were likely used in executions to fasten the person to a wooden stake. This nail may be similar to the nails employed by the Roman soldiers to fasten Jesus Christ to the stake. The artifact was found in a stone box, called an ossuary, into which the dried bones of a deceased person were placed after the flesh had decomposed. This indicates that someone executed on a stake could be given a burial.