1 God Is a Mystery​—Is It True?

What you may have heard: “God works in mysterious ways.”

“The Father Incomprehensible, the Son Incomprehensible, and the Holy Ghost Incomprehensible.”​—The Athanasian Creed, describing the Trinity taught by many churches of Christendom.

What the Bible teaches: Jesus said that those “taking in knowledge of . . . the only true God” would receive blessings. (John 17:3) But how can we take in knowledge of God if he is a mystery? Far from concealing himself, he wants everyone to know him.​—Jeremiah 31:34.

Of course, we will never know everything about God. This is to be expected because his thoughts and ways are higher than ours.​—Ecclesiastes 3:11; Isaiah 55:8, 9.

How knowing the truth helps you: If God is an incomprehensible mystery, then why even try to get to know him? Yet, he enables us not only to comprehend him but also to develop a close friendship with him. God described the faithful man Abraham as “my friend,” and King David of Israel wrote: “The intimacy with Jehovah belongs to those fearful of him.”​—Isaiah 41:8; Psalm 25:14.

Does the idea of having an intimate friendship with God seem farfetched? Perhaps so, but note what Acts 17:27 says: “[God] is not far off from each one of us.” In what way? Through the Bible, God provides what we need in order to know him well. *

He tells us his name, Jehovah. (Isaiah 42:8) He has recorded his deeds toward mankind so that we can know the Person behind the name. More than that, God reveals his emotions to us. He is “merciful and gracious, slow to anger and abundant in loving-kindness and truth.” (Exodus 34:6) Our actions can affect his feelings. For example, the ancient nation of Israel made him “feel hurt” when they rebelled against him, while those who wisely obey him bring him joy.​—Psalm 78:40; Proverbs 27:11.

[Footnote]

^ par. 7 For more information about what the Bible says about God, see chapter 1 of the book What Does the Bible Really Teach? published by Jehovah’s Witnesses.

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If God is a mysterious Trinity, how can we really get to know him?

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The Trinity c.1500, Flemish School, (16th century)/​H. Shickman Gallery, New York, USA/​The Bridgeman Art Library International