Remember to Say Thank You!

WHEN was the last time you received a thank-you note? When was the last time you sent one?

In this world of cyber communication, handwritten messages of gratitude have become something of an endangered species. Yet, saying “thank you” in writing is a special way to let people know that you appreciate their kindness. The following are some suggestions on how to do so.

1. Handwrite the note to give it a personal touch.

2. Address the recipient by name.

3. If you received a gift, name the gift and tell how you plan to use it.

4. Restate your thanks in closing.

A thank-you note makes a good impression on the recipient.

So the next time someone is hospitable to you, does a kind act, or gives you a gift, show that you do not take that one’s efforts for granted. Remember to say thank you!

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 Dear Aunt Mary, (2)

Thank you so much for the alarm clock! (3) Since I am a chronic oversleeper, I have already put it to good use. It was a pleasure to see you last week, and I hope you had a safe return home. We look forward to seeing you in the near future.

Thanks again for your thoughtful gift! (4)

Your nephew,

John

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(1)

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TIPS

● Refer to monetary gifts indirectly. For example, rather than specify the amount that you received, you could say: “Thank you for your generous gift. I plan to use it for . . .”

● Include only information that relates to the gift and your appreciation for it. This is not the time to give a detailed account of your summer vacation or of your recent trip to the hospital.

● Do not complain about any problems you had with the gift. For example, it would be unkind to write, “Thanks for the toaster​—but it doesn’t fit on my kitchen counter!”

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The Bible promotes a spirit of thankfulness. (Luke 17:11-19) It admonishes us to “pray incessantly” to God, adding: “In connection with everything give thanks.”​—1 Thessalonians 5:17, 18.